Archive for June, 2010

modular origami: 6 units sonobe

2010|06|28

Another oldy! I have done the diagram for the sonobe unit and a variation for a free magazine about Japan and japanese culture and that’s what this post is all about!

sonobe variation units and origami paper

This unit is known as the sonobe unit since it is general belief that 薗部光伸 / SONOBE Mitsunobu is it’s author. Some doubts about authorship do exist however.
Various assemblies are possible; with this exact diagram (no creases added) the cube or hexahedron, then with some added or modified creases you can create assemblies with 3 units, 12 units, 30 units and even more (:

6 units sonobe assembly (and sonobe variation)

I like the sonobe variation diagrams for key chains. In the photo, my actual key chain; I did glue the units and sprayed the finished model with varnish and left to dry for 2 days… An easy to do key chain, unique in the world! (; have you ever done origami key chains? Oh, this one also has styrofoam inside for sturdiness!

6 units sonobe variation key chain

Here is the diagram; it’s for viewing purposes since if it’ll be probably too cramped when printed. The original diagram for the magazine was different and I may or may not re-do this one for a printer friendly version. Probably not since I have a lot to do other than this and there’s so many origami related stuff I want to spend my time with. Sonobe is well known too, so… I’ll decide later.
On another note: I have been reading the comments! However it will take me a while to re-read and properly respond. I’m only one (;

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kusudama: fuse’s little turtle

2010|06|21
my cat and the little turtle kusudama

I present you my cat with an oldy! Well almost half of my cat. He’s very fond of kusudamas and origami. The greater the time I spend folding, the greater his interest will be… Cats! You can’t just help loving them! (: However, rest assured: I arrived in time to save the turtle! And to take a photo (;
FUSE’s little turtle has been around for some time but it certainly does not lose its charm! I love the unit for this kusudama; I think it’s so cute, especially if you have paper with nice prints and/ or colours. Also, this is one of my favourite kusudamas! Ok, practically all of FUSE’s kusudamas are my favourites…
Here is the first assembly! Five units around a centre point and then three units to form a hole; and you keep going until you’re out of the 30 units. It’s the most common and pretty in my opinion; due to the five units around a centre point it turns out very flower like. And, if you have not noticed, I love flowers! (:

little turtle (common)

little turtle (common)

The other assembly is done by inverting the first. You assemble three units around a centre point and then five units around/ to form the hole. It’s a different form of assembly; my first wasn’t done intentionally. Half way through I understood that I was doing the “wrong” assembly but even so I finished it. This is the second one and I’ve done it with brighter colours so it’s much more to my liking!

the two 30 units little turtle assemblies

the two 30 units little turtle assemblies

Both were done with wrapping paper cut in 7x7cm/ 2.75” squares. The blue has a diameter of 8cm/ 3.15” and the flowery one of 10cm/ 3.90”. In the photos above you can notice that the assembly method changes the final size of the kusudama.
You may or may not glue the units; I glued them because the paper was too thin and slippery but with stronger and a little textured paper you don’t need any glue.

the other little turtle assembly

the other little turtle assembly

You have these two complementary assemblies in most, if not all, 30 units kusudama so, be attentive and experiment a lot! I want to try one more variant of this kusudama, with more units, but I still have a lot of kusudamas in my “waiting to be folded” list. Ah, vacation time will be great!

wet folding & little terrier

2010|06|14

These are some dogs I folded a few months ago to try out the wet folding technique. The little terrier is simple enough to fold and in wet folding you can add more expression to the model; I didn’t quite get it in the first model but I enjoyed the little details you can add. As soon as I get myself some free time I’ll do it again!
The paper I used was some scraps of mi-teintes canson I had; any canson like paper is good for this model and this technique, like fabriano paper. The bigger the paper the stiffer it can be and the smaller the less unless you want to do it the hard way.
The model is little terrier of Francisco Javier Caboblanco, such a nice doggie! Since I have found the diagram on the net, I’ll share it here too. Unless I’m told to remove it because of copyright issues.

little terrier in canson mi-teintes

little terrier in canson mi-teintes

Quick resume of the wet folding technique
You’ll need a base to humidify the paper, a sprayer with clean water, a clean sponge or towel (whatever works best for you; I use a small towel), the paper. It helps if you had already folded the model or have studied the diagram; when wet folding you need to be fast or you’ll end up with a paper too dry to fold or you’ll damp the paper too much because you keep spraying it.
I cut the squares first because I don’t damp the paper limits that much but you may damp the paper first and cut the squares after that. To damp the paper you spray it evenly with the water; after that you’ll pass the towel or the sponge. This spreads the water evenly and absorbs the excess water. If the paper is too big or too stiff/ heavy you may turn the sheet over and repeat but with less water.
You now have a dampened paper that feels weird to fold: congratulations! You just have to remind yourself that when wet folding you use your fingers and don’t press much. Don’t use your nails and don’t drag your fingers/nails to crease the fold! The objective is to have a model that is life like and creased fold marls wipe that way.

If you are folding little terrier, now you fold the faster and the more accurate you know and you’ll end up shaping the torso, ears and tail of the dog. Experiment a lot and have fun. If you end up with something that doesn’t resemble a dog, well that happens! The next one will be more appealing! You may want to use something to keep the dog shape (like springs or paper clips) until it dries. After dried it keeps its shape for quite a long time, I’ve heard that for years but I can’t guarantee that.

You may also want to try ranoshi by David Derudas; I read that it’s an appropriate model for wet folding. Last time I checked his site it was remodelling and the model was nowhere to be found but keep trying and may find it on-line somewhere. Also, feel free to search around about the wet folding technique: you’ll find more and better explanations than mine!
This is also the fist time I used paper as background for the photos. It gives a more live feeling to the dogs than the usual background, in my humble opinion that is.

Origami to decorate!

2010|06|08

Hello! (: This is a post about last summer!
As usual I was super busy… Last exams at university, squeezing time to some beach fun (I actually went 6times to the beach! yay me! lol) and, as a favour, some hours at a decoration shop a friend owns. One of the house policies is to always ornament the bags with the goods to the clients. Of course I couldn’t let this slip trough! (: After finding a gorgeous crepe paper – you know, the crumpled paper available in lot of colours usually really thin and in small rolls – that’s actually stiff and allows folding, I started to think in simple things to fold and decorate bags.
The paper is in a really nice purple colour and I decided to do butterflies! Akira YOSHIZAWA’s butterflies to be more accurate. They turned out great even though the paper was small (approximately 16x16cm and 9x9cm, respectively 6.3×6.3 and 3.5×3.5 inches) and resulted in small butterflies; height of 7.5cm/ 3” and 5cm/ 2″. Searching further I found the reminiscences of a pink variant but since it was from the end of the roll it was very very crumpled and the result was not so neat. However the pink is really pretty so all ends well. The pink butterflies were done from squares, if one could call squares to that, of approximately 8x8cm / 3.1×3.1″ that resulted in butterflies with the height of 4.5cm /1.7″.

butterflies in crepe paper

butterflies in crepe paper

butterflies in crepe paper

carnation and butterflies in crepe paper

I’ve also tried to do some lilies and another easy flower, a carnation. I was all set to buy at least two or three rolls of that paper… Purple, a vivid pink and sky blue is what I was aiming for but it totally slipped my mind until I talked about these butterflies to a friend…

lily in crepe paper

carnations in pink and purple

carnations in pink and purple

carnations in pink and purple

I remembered I had some photos and here it is! A post with lots of pictures; the quality of the pictures isn’t that good but you get to see some origami in action. I don’t have a picture of any of the finished bags though. If I find one I’ll add it here! Oh, the clients also enjoyed the bags (;